Book Review: Robert Cialdini, Edyne Plancy…How To Have Clients Say Yes

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Persuasion or gently coaxing others to act in your favour is so prevalent in our day to day lives and even more during the holiday seasons or any other “holiday type” for that matter.  I met Robert Cialdini during one of his workshops around his book called “Influence: The Psychology of Persuasion”. The two-day event was full of valuable examples and hands-on exercises about the six universal principles. I remember devouring the book in two days. It is a fascinating read and I recommend you add it to your repertoire.

Robert Cialdini and Edyne Plancy

EDYNE PLANCY & ROBERT CIALDINI, PH.D

We also learned about what persuasion scientists call the “Implementation Intention Plan”. 

Most of us have what I call “backup intentions” ready for the countdown as the year is ending. Too many “backup goals” are set and go unfulfilled. We want to improve our career prospects, get that promotion or learn a new skill. Some people will even do the research, take courses online and not make it to class. What about that health club membership, only to find that our attendance dwindles only after a few sessions. What about our intention to save some money for a great trip or a new car? Once again, summer arrives and the trip passes you by or we use credit cards and make another “backup promise” to cut expenses and pay off our debts.

There is a deep canyon between intention and implementation. That’s one of the reasons most goals are never met.

Cialdini newest book is a sequel called Pre-suasion. I can not wait to read my copy. Here is a review by Sandy Clarke at star2.com

star2.com

When it comes to influencing others, timing is key, according to Cialdini. And just to show how crucial it is, he offers up an amusing example where he himself gets caught out by the very principles he’s set out for millions of people throughout the world.

While visiting another university, he had planned to use a semester to work on Pre-suasion. Since he had no major commitments, it was the perfect opportunity to spend some quality time on research and writing.

Just before he set off for the school that would be his home for a brief time, the dean called him up to tell him about the wonderful office space he would be afforded, the state-of-the-art equipment he’d be using, and the support that would be made available to him. As you can imagine, the professor was both humbled and appreciative of the dean’s generosity.

But then, there came a request. Another professor had fallen ill, and the dean had wondered whether Cialdini would be able to teach just one class. Despite the time pressure this would place on him in working on the book, he agreed to the dean’s request and the book – for a time – slid down the to-do list.

Had the dean told his visiting professor about the favourable conditions and then waited a couple of days or so to make his request, would Cialdini have been so agreeable? Probably not. When making requests of others off the back of a favour offered to them, they are more likely to agree if the request is made immediately. The longer it’s put off, the more time the person’s sense of obligation has to wear off.

In Pre-suasion, Robert Cialdini draws on a wealth of studies that suggest subtle primers help to increase the chances of a desired outcome. For example, in US hotels, guests are almost 50% more likely to reuse their towels if the hotel suggested it had already made a charitable contribution to an environmental group, than if the gesture were to be made after the towels had been reused.

Cialdini also talks about the importance of unity when influencing others. Going deeper than the feeling that someone is “like” us, persuasion stands a bigger chance of succeeding if we feel someone is “one of us”.

Demonstrating the power of unity, an experiment is cited, whereby parents’ participation in a survey rose from 20% to 97% when they were under the impression that a minor benefit for their child was at stake.

Cialdini also makes mention of one of Warren Buffet’s famous annual letters to his Berkshire-Hathaway staff, which talked about the company’s succession plan for life post-Buffet. “I will tell you what I would say to my family today if they asked me about Berkshire’s future,” writes Buffet, making great use of the sense of unity in a letter that was praised by shareholders as being one of his most effective.

Pre-suasion offers a ton of enthralling insights into the world of influence and persuasion, and is yet another gripping, engaging read by Robert Cialdini, who has produced a sequel masterpiece to follow his first.

Author: Robert Cialdini Publisher: Simon & Schuster Paperbacks, non-fiction

Robert Cialdini’s sequel is a testament to his talent of presenting complex matters in an enjoyable and accessible manner.

read more at star2.com

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